Research

Our work programme covers the full chain of bioenergy, including research on:

Resources

Researching and developing the production and potential of different biomass and waste feedstocks. This explores options for the production of sufficient feedstock to support the UK bioenergy system without negatively impacting food production while maximising local environmental and global climate benefits. This Topic Group is led by Iain Donnison (Aberystwyth University).

Pre-treatment and Conversion

Identifying preferred bioenergy pathways and developing new technologies and systems that support the hub’s vision for UK bioenergy. This Topic Group is led by Jason Hallett (Imperial College London), Tony Bridgwater (Aston University) and Chris Hardacre (University of Manchester).

Vectors

Identifying and selecting appropriate energy vectors to determine how they fit within a wider biorefinery strategy to reduce carbon and reliance on fossil fuel, and to maximise national and regional resilience. This Topic Group is led by Marcelle McManus (University of Bath).

Systems

Assessing the role and sustainability of bioenergy on energy systems and related sectors, and its impact on the energy trilemma of affordability, resilience and carbon reduction. This Topic Group is led by Mirjam Röder (Aston University).

We have four Topic Group Representatives who work across topic groups and support the Topic Group Leaders with engagement and outreach activities, as well as strategic management. They are: Rebecca Rowe (Centre for Ecology and Hydrology) representing Resources and Systems; Andrew Welfle (University of Manchester) representing Vectors and Resources; Robert Holland (University of Southampton) representing Systems and Resources; and Katie Chong (Aston University) who represents Pre-Treatment and Conversion and Vectors.

Get in touch

For more information, click on the links above or email supergen-bioenergy@aston.ac.uk.

 

Previous research projects

The latest phase of the Supergen Bioenergy Hub launched in November 2018 and will run until October 2022.

For details of research projects from the previous phase of the Hub, click the link above.

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